By 2020, ecosystems that provide essential services, including services related to water, and contribute to health, livelihoods and well-being, are restored and safeguarded, taking into account the needs of women, indigenous and local communities and the poor and vulnerable.

Global change and conservation triage on National Wildlife Refuges

This resource discusses the role of “conservation triage”, a framework concerned with the allocation of scarce resources to maximize conservation effectiveness, in making decisions complicated by ecological and social values, climate change, and other management issues on United States National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs). The resource uses data derived from meetings and workshops with management professionals on coastal NWRs to examine professional perspectives and opportunities for improvement in scientific decision-making using social science techniques.

Informing Strategic Efforts to Expand and Connect Protected Areas Using a Model of Ecological Flow, with Application to the Western United States

This resource models current ecological linkages and terrestrial movement patterns to identify public yet unprotected lands in the western United States which may have high ecological value and strong connectivity with existing protected areas.

Economic and environmental implications of alternative landscape designs in the Walnut Creek Watershed of Iowa

This resource compares three landscape scenarios for a Midwestern agricultural watershed, with each proposed management strategy prioritizing one of three values: agricultural productivity, water quality, and biodiversity. The economic and environmental implications of each scenario are evaluated to determine the associated costs and benefits to the future of the region.

A sustainable biomass industry for the North American Great Plains

This resource provides background and guidance regarding the potential of sustainable biomass production to mitigate climate change and build an effective biofuel industry. The resource uses the example of the North American Great Plains to demonstrate how biomass production can have environmental, economic, and social benefits.

Challenges and successes in engaging citizen scientists to observe snow cover: from public engagement to an educational collaboration

This resource evaluates different strategies for using citizen science to collect observational data on snow disappearance in the Pacific Northwest. The most successful strategy was found to be a collaborative education campaign, which met the project’s dual goals of generating useful data for a study on the influence of forest cover on snow disappearance timing, and acting as an effective public engagement tactic.